University Foot & Ankle Institute
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Ankle Conditions: Talar Dome Cartilage Damage (Osteochrondral Lesion)

What's an Osteochondral Lesion and how can it occur?

Talar Dome Cartilage Damage

 

The talus bone of the ankle, commonly known as the ankle bone, transfers weight-bearing from the shin to the foot. The second largest of the tarsal bones, the talus has the highest percentage of surface area covered by cartilage in the entire human body.  Unlike most bones, no muscles attach to the talus and its position depends on that of the neighboring bones.

 

Cartilage damage of the ankle, also know as an osteochondral lesion of the talus, can occur from a traumatic fracture or ankle sprain, when the bones in the ankle joint hit each other damaging the cartilage surface. The initial pain may resolve, but the pain often comes back during exercise, with possible locking of the joint.

 

The University Foot and Ankle Institute is one of the top foot and ankle centers in the world. Our doctors and surgeons are recognized for providing treatment of large Osteochondral lesions of the talus with removal or fresh transplant.

I hesitated to see a doctor because I thought I would be told to stop running... when I saw Dr. Franson, I got encouragement instead of discouragement. Suzanne at Physical Therapy not only got rid of the pain, but she also taught me how to avoid further injury. Foot & Ankle Institute goes the extra mile for their patients. Suzanne helped me go 13.1 miles! On March 20th, I completed the Moab Half Marathon without any pain in my legs. Kerri

Diagnosing Osteochondral Lesion of the Talus

 

The diagnosis of cartilage damage (osteochondral lesion) is often done with x-rays and/or an MRI. Initial x-rays are taken to check the alignment of the foot and ankle, as well as look for any bone damage. With an MRI, the ligament structures, tendons and cartilage of the ankle can be examined and analyzed.

 

Talar Dome - University Foot and Ankle Institute

Surgical Osteochondral Lesion treatment options

 

Depending on the extent of the cartilage damage, treatment options may include arthroscopic removal of the damaged cartilage and drilling of the damaged region prompting the growth of new cartilage called fibrocartilage. If the lesion is large or involves the deep bone below the cartilage-damaged area, a transplant of fresh bone and cartilage, either from the patient’s knee or from a lab, is placed as a plug into the injured region.

 

What to expect after Talar Dome surgery

 

Because the talus bone lacks a strong blood supply, healing a broken talus can take longer than most bones. Patients recovering from a broken talus may not be able to walk for several months without crutches, after which they will likely wear a walking cast or boot for a length of time.

 

Why choose UFAI podiatrists for your Talar Dome treatment?

 

The University Foot and Ankle Institute is one of the top foot and ankle centers in the world. Our doctors and surgeons are recognized for providing treatment of large Osteochondral lesions of the talus with removal or fresh transplant.

 

Each surgery option can be performed at one of our nine Southern California locations, where every patient is treated for their specific situation.