Percutaneous Achilles Repair System (PARS)

Updated 9/22/2020
UFAI Achilles rupture patient demonstrates Achilles tendon strength just 3 months after the PARS procedure.

What is the PARS Procedure for Achilles Rupture Repair?

 

PARS (percutaneous Achilles repair system) is a revolutionary minimally invasive treatment for a ruptured Achilles tendon repair.

 

The PARS Procedure heals faster because recovery from the minimally-invasive PARS surgery is much quicker than with a traditional open repair technique,.

 

Additionally, the end result is much stronger than previous repair techniques and leaves our patients with essentially no scarring.

What are the Benefits of the PARS Procedure?

Dr. Baravarian discusses Achilles tendon ruptures and the minimally invasive techniques available at UFAI.

The Achilles tendon doesn’t rupture cleanly; its fibers shred like frayed rope. In traditional tendon repair surgeries, an “open repair” technique is used. The surgeon makes a 10-15cm vertical incision on the back of the ankle and pries open the skin to gain complete access to the Achilles.

 

Then the frayed ends of the tendon are sewed back together which can be difficult due to the level of damage and fraying of the tendon ends. Due to the incision and repair of the tendon in the damaged area, the patient needs to be kept in a cast for a long period of time, 6-8 weeks, resulting in tendon weakness, scar tissue formation, and an unsightly skin scar.

 

The benefits of the minimally invasive PARS technique allow for a very small incision, much less scarring, and a cleaner, speedier recovery. We make a 1 cm horizontal incision across the Achilles region, then slide in PARS repair guide into the healthy portion of Achilles away from the torn spot. The PARS device allows placement of four sutures into the healthy tendon ends, which are then stitched in an hourglass shape, joining the ruptured ends of the tendon together for a greater area of compression.

 

UFAI PARS Yelp Patient Review, in her own words...

The following five star Yelp review was posted by University Foot and Ankle patient, Takashi.

5 Star Yelp review, University Foot and Ankle Institute

In March of 2017, I ruptured my left Achilles tendon while playing sports. My orthopedic surgeon at the time gave me basically only one option, open surgery.

 

I did some research and discovered there was another option, PARS (percutaneous Achilles repair system). This type of surgery was less invasive and the recovery time was much faster. My orthopedist did not offer this, he only offered open surgery. University Foot & Ankle was the name that always came up while researching PARS.

 

I scheduled an appointment and met with Dr. Redkar. Dr. Redkar was warming and attentive from the first encounter. She gave me 2 options, nonoperative which requires months of casting or surgery with PARS technique. Of course, I opted for the PARS surgery technique.

 

During my whole experience, from office visits to surgery then follow-ups, Dr. Redkar, and the office staffs were incredible. I'm on my way back to normal now, and I owe it all to Dr. Redkar. Thank you so much.

 

Click here to see Takashi's review on Yelp.com.

 

Achilles Repair Surgery, What to Expect in Recovery

PARS Achilles Rupture Repair Scar Results
PARS procedure incision, 3 months post-op.

Recovery from this minimally-invasive surgery is much quicker than with a traditional open repair technique, and the finished product is much stronger with essentially no scarring.

 

Patients wear a cast for two weeks, and then are fitted with a boot and can bear weight on the foot at 4 weeks.

 

The tiny incision heals within a week and there’s minimal scarring. Patients can start physical therapy earlier, putting them on track faster towards their normal activities.

 

Additionally, the tendon heals with a thinner, more natural contour for a cosmetically appealing reconstruction.

 

Why UFAI is Your Best Choice for Achilles Tendon Treatment

 

The physicians at University Foot and Ankle Institute are nationally recognized leaders in the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures and are often called upon to train other surgeons in the techniques utilized at UFAI.

 

Our foot and ankle surgeons worked closely in the development of the PARS technique, a minimally invasive state-of-the-art technology that results in higher success rates, less scarring, and a quicker, stronger recovery.

 

Recovery from minimally-invasive surgery is much quicker than with a traditional open repair technique, and the finished product is much stronger with essentially no scarring.

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